31 8 / 2014

givemeinternet:

Was this a joke or is someone getting fired?

givemeinternet:

Was this a joke or is someone getting fired?

(via azncopyright)

31 8 / 2014

31 8 / 2014

awwww-cute:

So happy I got a puppy

awwww-cute:

So happy I got a puppy

31 8 / 2014

malformalady:

An 83-year old woman is the first in the world to receive a full 3D-printed titanium lower jaw implant. Amazingly, the combined effort by researchers and engineers from Belgium and the Netherlands is said to have allowed the patient unrestricted mandibular movement within a day of surgery.

malformalady:

An 83-year old woman is the first in the world to receive a full 3D-printed titanium lower jaw implant. Amazingly, the combined effort by researchers and engineers from Belgium and the Netherlands is said to have allowed the patient unrestricted mandibular movement within a day of surgery.

(via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014

valmonella:

astrotastic:

lickystickypickywe:

That thing you see in this person abdomen is part of her skull.

The abdomen in question belongs to former “Mrs. Idaho” Jamie Hilton. Back in June, Hilton was involved in a devastating accident, and had to undergo emergency brain surgery. In the process, her doctors removed 25% of her skull so that her severely swollen brain would have room to return to its normal size. Fully intending to reattach the skull fragment later, Hilton’s doctors stowed it away inside her stomach, where her body would keep it nourished until she was ready to have it reattached.

In the weeks ahead, Hilton recovered marvelously, all while missing a full quarter of her skull. She wore a helmet to help prevent further injury.

By mid-July, Hilton’s swelling had subsided enough for doctors to remove the fragment from her abdomen and put it back in place with the aid of some titanium screws and plates. It’s been over two months since her second surgery, and seems to be doing incredibly well, telling the New York Post that the only lasting effect seems to have been a change in her tastebuds and the loss of her sense of smell.

As for her head, it’s back to its normal shape, albeit with a pretty awesome-looking scar. 

You can read more about Hilton’s remarkable healing process over on her blog, where she and her husband have catalogued the entire ordeal. For more information on the surgery that Hilton had performed (decompressive hemicraniectomy), check out this post by Bradley Voit, who wrote about the procedure in detail when Congresswoman Gabby Giffords had it performed back in January 2011.

Fuck yeah, modern medicine!

Woah

(via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014


A donor heart beating in a mechanical system which keeps it warm, oxygenated, with nutrient enriched blood pumping through.

A donor heart beating in a mechanical system which keeps it warm, oxygenated, with nutrient enriched blood pumping through.

(Source: science-is-everything, via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014

beegoestomedicalschool:

moshita:

anatomical chocolate

visualanatomy

SCHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAATZIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!!!!!!!!!!!! 

Where do I get me some?!

(via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014

compoundfractur:

Be careful working with a lathe

compoundfractur:

Be careful working with a lathe

(Source: ragincontagion, via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014

redulent-noir:

skeleton torso

redulent-noir:

skeleton torso

(via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014

31 8 / 2014

nakimedicalblog:

by-grace-of-god:

Human Life in the Womb

1. At just 4 days after fertilization… What? That zygote doesn’t look human? Well, scientifically, it is! It’s growing, so it must be alive. It has human parents, so it must be human. In fact, since fertilization, that zygote has possessed a predetermined sex (it’s a girl!) and her own unique set of human DNA. Her DNA will guide her body’s development over the next nine months (and its entire lifetime!). Remember, don’t judge or discriminate against other human beings just because they don’t look like us!

2. At just 5-6 weeks of gestation…Despite being only a quarter of an inch long, her nose, mouth, and ears are already taking shape! Her heart is beating about 100 times a minute (almost twice as fast as yours) and blood is beginning to circulate through her body. Brain waves have been detectable for at least 2-3 weeks already!

3. At just 7 weeks gestation…Most of that growth is concentrated in the head as new brain cells are generated at the rate of 100 per minute. Your baby’s mouth and tongue are forming as arm and leg buds sprout, and those little kidneys are getting ready to do their job (pee production and excretion).

4. At about 10 weeks…All of her major body functions are up and running: the kidneys, intestines, brain, and liver are all working. Her tiny arms and legs can already start to flex. Most abortions in the United States take place around this time. If she’s lucky, her mom will love her enough to let her live.

5. At 12 weeks…Her muscles are beginning to bulk up, so she’s busily stretching and kicking. If you put your hand on your tummy, she’ll likely wiggle in response because her reflexes are starting to develop, although you won’t feel it yet.

6. At 16 weeks gestation…This week, the baby is going through a growth spurt. Soon she’ll be growing locks of hair on her head and she’s already started growing toenails. Every day, her heart pumps about 25 quarts of blood through her body.

7. Sucking her thumb at about 18-20 weeks gestation…Right about now, she has her own unique set of fingerprints.

8. Around 6-7 months gestation…The baby can now respond to external sounds by moving and increasing the pulse. A mother may notice jerking motions if the baby hiccups!

9. At around 8 months gestation…This baby can hear and is beginning to recognize her mother’s voice. Her skin is pink and she already is beginning to get that cute, chunky appearance that newborns have. That extra fat is very important, because it allows the baby to regulate her temperature after birth.

We’re all just grown up embryos…

THIS IS SO FUCKING COOL

(via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014

artsciencenursing:

Neuro degeneration 

artsciencenursing:

Neuro degeneration 

(Source: artssciencenursing, via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014

jewsee-medicalstudent:

Would you like to be awake while having open-heart surgery?
This is the astonishing picture of Swaroup Anand, a 23-year-old patient that went under the knife in Bangalore at Wockhardt Hospital while he was still very much awake. Doctors chose to numb his body with an epidural to the neck rather than send him to sleep with general anaesthesia. 
Lead surgeon Dr Vivek Jawali, said they had performed more than 600 operations this way since 1999. Speaking from his hospital in India, he said: “There has been a huge effort in recent times to make heart surgery less invasive. This can be done in two ways. Firstly smaller cuts can be made and this is helped with modern technology and robotics. Secondly we are trying to interfere as little as possible with the body’s natural functions.”
"The patients are given a mild sedative rather than being knocked out - this drops their heart rate but means they can respond to commands. The patients are drowsy so they can be aroused but are also able to drift into sleep,” Dr Jawali said. “If we need them to cough or breathe more deeply to clear air from their heart they can respond. This makes the procedure a lot easier to perform.”
(Read more).

jewsee-medicalstudent:

Would you like to be awake while having open-heart surgery?

This is the astonishing picture of Swaroup Anand, a 23-year-old patient that went under the knife in Bangalore at Wockhardt Hospital while he was still very much awake. Doctors chose to numb his body with an epidural to the neck rather than send him to sleep with general anaesthesia. 

Lead surgeon Dr Vivek Jawali, said they had performed more than 600 operations this way since 1999. Speaking from his hospital in India, he said: “There has been a huge effort in recent times to make heart surgery less invasive. This can be done in two ways. Firstly smaller cuts can be made and this is helped with modern technology and robotics. Secondly we are trying to interfere as little as possible with the body’s natural functions.”

"The patients are given a mild sedative rather than being knocked out - this drops their heart rate but means they can respond to commands. The patients are drowsy so they can be aroused but are also able to drift into sleep,” Dr Jawali said. “If we need them to cough or breathe more deeply to clear air from their heart they can respond. This makes the procedure a lot easier to perform.”

(Read more).

(via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014

thisfuturemd:

thisfuturemd:

“Keep studying and get that M.D.”

re-reblogging since people keep changing the source. Should have tagged this from the beginning…

thisfuturemd:

thisfuturemd:

“Keep studying and get that M.D.”

re-reblogging since people keep changing the source. Should have tagged this from the beginning…

(via premedkarlie)

31 8 / 2014

ladykaymd:

thebiopsy:

"What is your hand on?" the surgeon asked, her question punctuated by the whirr of the ventilator wheezing away in the chilly operating room.
I stood there for a moment, quietly, just trying to get a sense of where my hand was in the first place. In reality, I knew just where my hand was. It wasn’t a trick question and it wasn’t particularly hard to answer. Part of me, though, just didn’t allow the realization to sink in. So, I stood there, searching for something more, something other than what my fingers obviously felt.
My mind stretched back to anatomy and embryology at the very beginning of the year for answers. Last August, everything, everyone, was new. My white coat was freshly white, uncreased, neatly kept, gleaming with my newly minted nametag - “Roheet Kakaday, Medical Student”. I had achieved the dream, but the promise had yet to be fulfilled. 
The first time I entered the anatomy lab, a chill ran down my body - the kind you get when you’re about to do something really significant. It was cold, like the operating room I was in now, and lives lived lay in front of us, waiting for us to learn. I learned and, soon, everything I saw became an anatomical problem. Short of breath? Probably a pulmonary abnormality. Patient has unilateral leg pain? Probably a pinched nerve between the piriformis and gemellus. Patient can’t move her arm? Brachial plexus neuropathy. As it turned out, some of that knowledge actually came in handy.
A few months later, all of that was complicated by biochemistry, by far one of my more challenging courses. Cycles, pathways, histologies, and reactions galore mucked up my once pristine anatomical differentials. Now, not only could it be a neuropathy, but, perhaps, an error in metabolism? Is she getting enough vitamins and amino acid precursors? What’s her diet like? The factors to consider multiplied ten fold. 
Then, along came physiology. Coming from an engineering background, where overviews take precedence over details, the homeostatic control systems of the body were a breath of fresh air relative to memorizing minutiae. Now, however, the differential became even more complex - could the neuropathy be because of a chemical imbalance? Hormonal dysfunction? The factors to consider grew again. 
Finally, immunology and infections hit with one last volume of information. Bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic etiologies ran amok in my differentials. Could it be an infection? Could it be cancer? Could it be an autoimmune disease? The factors, now, were astounding in number.
In the background, I started a company, won some awards, became an advisor for Stanford University’s Medicine X, was approached by entrepreneurs to collaborate on my electronic health record idea, joined a research team, started co-hosting a podcast on medical innovation, and more. The funny thing is, there is yet more in the pipeline.
Looking back on the year, it was incredible to think I did these things and finished medical school in one piece. None of it would be possible without the incredible support of friends, family, and folks on the Internet, like you, who would reach out to me.
At the end of the first year of medical school, the facts I have learned (and, let’s be honest, forgotten) is staggering. Indeed, the responsibility of managing that burden of knowledge is daunting. In the same vein, it’s still what keeps medical school exciting; the intellectual challenge is what motivates many of us medical students and the satisfaction of helping another is what helps keep us going.
If anything, I can say I have a basis now, a basic platform upon which to further build a clinical career, an idea with which to piece together the puzzle of human disease. That is incredible in and of itself.
"Mmmm?" the surgeon prompted me again. 
Snapped out of my brief lapse, I found myself back in the operating room. I looked into the open chest my hand had disappeared into. My fingers felt it - thump, thump, thump - and there was no need to even think.
It was, to some degree, instinctual now. 
"It’s the left ventricle…" I let that hover for a moment, "My hand is on the heart." It’s slick surface thumped and slid across my fingers, frozen in awe.
My wide-eyed amazement slowly sunk into the corners of the OR and the surgeon resumed working. As phenomenal as that was, I realized that this will be my new normal. This will be my everyday. 
And that is incredibly exciting.

"I realized that this will be my new normal. This will be my everyday. 
And that is incredibly exciting.”
I love that. 
Excellent piece by the lovely Roheet.
Medicine still remains the most incredible, wonderful thing in the world to me. :) We’re so incredibly lucky to get to do what we do every day. 

ladykaymd:

thebiopsy:

"What is your hand on?" the surgeon asked, her question punctuated by the whirr of the ventilator wheezing away in the chilly operating room.

I stood there for a moment, quietly, just trying to get a sense of where my hand was in the first place. In reality, I knew just where my hand was. It wasn’t a trick question and it wasn’t particularly hard to answer. Part of me, though, just didn’t allow the realization to sink in. So, I stood there, searching for something more, something other than what my fingers obviously felt.

My mind stretched back to anatomy and embryology at the very beginning of the year for answers. Last August, everything, everyone, was new. My white coat was freshly white, uncreased, neatly kept, gleaming with my newly minted nametag - “Roheet Kakaday, Medical Student”. I had achieved the dream, but the promise had yet to be fulfilled

The first time I entered the anatomy lab, a chill ran down my body - the kind you get when you’re about to do something really significant. It was cold, like the operating room I was in now, and lives lived lay in front of us, waiting for us to learn. I learned and, soon, everything I saw became an anatomical problem. Short of breath? Probably a pulmonary abnormality. Patient has unilateral leg pain? Probably a pinched nerve between the piriformis and gemellus. Patient can’t move her arm? Brachial plexus neuropathy. As it turned out, some of that knowledge actually came in handy.

A few months later, all of that was complicated by biochemistry, by far one of my more challenging courses. Cycles, pathways, histologies, and reactions galore mucked up my once pristine anatomical differentials. Now, not only could it be a neuropathy, but, perhaps, an error in metabolism? Is she getting enough vitamins and amino acid precursors? What’s her diet like? The factors to consider multiplied ten fold. 

Then, along came physiology. Coming from an engineering background, where overviews take precedence over details, the homeostatic control systems of the body were a breath of fresh air relative to memorizing minutiae. Now, however, the differential became even more complex - could the neuropathy be because of a chemical imbalance? Hormonal dysfunction? The factors to consider grew again. 

Finally, immunology and infections hit with one last volume of information. Bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic etiologies ran amok in my differentials. Could it be an infection? Could it be cancer? Could it be an autoimmune disease? The factors, now, were astounding in number.

In the background, I started a companywon some awardsbecame an advisor for Stanford University’s Medicine X, was approached by entrepreneurs to collaborate on my electronic health record ideajoined a research team, started co-hosting a podcast on medical innovation, and more. The funny thing is, there is yet more in the pipeline.

Looking back on the year, it was incredible to think I did these things and finished medical school in one piece. None of it would be possible without the incredible support of friends, family, and folks on the Internet, like you, who would reach out to me.

At the end of the first year of medical school, the facts I have learned (and, let’s be honest, forgotten) is staggering. Indeed, the responsibility of managing that burden of knowledge is daunting. In the same vein, it’s still what keeps medical school exciting; the intellectual challenge is what motivates many of us medical students and the satisfaction of helping another is what helps keep us going.

If anything, I can say I have a basis now, a basic platform upon which to further build a clinical career, an idea with which to piece together the puzzle of human disease. That is incredible in and of itself.

"Mmmm?" the surgeon prompted me again. 

Snapped out of my brief lapse, I found myself back in the operating room. I looked into the open chest my hand had disappeared into. My fingers felt it - thump, thump, thump - and there was no need to even think.

It was, to some degree, instinctual now. 

"It’s the left ventricle…" I let that hover for a moment, "My hand is on the heart." It’s slick surface thumped and slid across my fingers, frozen in awe.

My wide-eyed amazement slowly sunk into the corners of the OR and the surgeon resumed working. As phenomenal as that was, I realized that this will be my new normal. This will be my everyday. 

And that is incredibly exciting.

"I realized that this will be my new normal. This will be my everyday. 

And that is incredibly exciting.”

I love that. 

Excellent piece by the lovely Roheet.

Medicine still remains the most incredible, wonderful thing in the world to me. :) We’re so incredibly lucky to get to do what we do every day. 

(via premedkarlie)